Autism: Letter to Parents Whose Children Line Up Their Toys

 

Does your child love to line up their toys?

If so, read until the end because what you’ll learn may surprise you. As someone who consults for families and gives talks on early intervention plans, this is one of the most common things I see amongst toddlers and younger children who are on the autism spectrum.

When I was a kid, I loved routines and order. Having a structure was important for me; it put me in a place of comfort. This started as early as I could remember. They would usually start with trains and Legos. I used to love to organize my trains in height order. As my love of toys began to grow as I got older, this became a common trend with my Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles action figures and then other things in my house as well.

This fascination turned later into a love for spinning toys over and over. However, this stopped for me because I’d often twirl my hair to mimic the behavior of spinning when I didn’t have any toys around. This used to leave my hair in knots at a time when my hair was long because my parents couldn’t cut my hair due to my ongoing sensory issues.

I often enjoyed this much more than interacting with others, including my family and friends. I’m not going to lie, some of that structure has gone away as years have gone by (talking from the current perspective of a 28-year-old man who needs to clean his apartment when I hate to clean).

My parents used my love of lining up toys as a way to help me build on my social skills. I came up with stories for each lined-up toy and role-played different scenarios they were a part of. Then I recorded the stories I came up with and watched them during free time.

But when it came time to read, things became a lot different…

One day I was going through a closet and found a folded letter that an old teacher wrote to my mother.

I opened it…

The actual message written on the letter was:

Your son is Mentally Deficient. We cannot let him attend our school anymore. He is Expelled.”

Waves of emotion washed over me and tears rolled down his cheek as he read the letter to himself. That very day, I wrote down in my diary…

“I am a mentally deficient child whose mother turned him into the genius of the century.”

Listen, this true story is a perfect example that no teacher will ever care more about your child’s education than you as a mother.

The most crucial thing we can do for our child is teach them the joy of reading, at the earliest age possible.

This is an easy reading program designed to specifically for mothers like you, to quickly have your child reading better than all other children their age.

Even if they’re as young as 2, don’t know their alphabet at all and currently show zero interest in reading whatsoever.

So at what age can you start teaching a child to read?

When they’re babies? At 2 years old, 3, 4, or 5 years old, or wait until they’re in school?

According to the National Assessment of Educational Progress,

If you delay your child’s reading skill development until he or she enters school, you are putting your child at risk…

Did you know that 67% of all Grade 4 students cannot read at a proficient level!

Of that 67%, 33% read at just the BASIC level,

And 34% CANNOT even achieve reading abilities of the lowest basic level!

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